Past fellowships 

 

Arctic Aerosols - Anthropogenic and natural effects on climate forcing


Ingeborg Nieslon receiced

 

Ingeborg Elbæk Nielsen

Duration of the project: 1. February 2014 to 31. January 2017

Partners in the project: University of Aarhus, University of Lund and University of California.

 

Short description of the project:
Black carbon (BC) was recently ranked as the second largest anthropogenic contributor to global warming. The purpose of the project is to combine laboratory and field studies at the Villum Research Station in North Greenland to re-evaluate the climate forcing properties of BC. The project will determine the impacts of aging and coating of BC with organic and sulphuric acid on the forcing applying the state-of-the-art Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). Furthermore the study will serve as a baseline characterisation of Arctic aerosols, including BC, in order to assess the impacts of the future increase in local and regional emissions.

 

Short CV:

Technical University of Denmark:
09/2013 – M.Sc. in Environmental Engineering
12/2010 – B.Sc. in Environmental Engineering

My master thesis focused on BC at Station Nord in North Greenland where I determined the mass concentration of BC and organic carbon in air together with mass concentrations of BC in snow. Furthermore I investigated the BC source apportionment applying the Positive Matrix Factorization model.

 


  

Modelling of the climate impact of natural gas flaring in the Arctic

Joana decent

 

Joana Soares

Duration of the project: 1. January 2015 to 31. December 2016

Partners in the project: Norwegian Polar Institute, Finnish Meteorological Institute and University of Helsinki, Finland

 

Short description of the projced

The main goal of the project is to reproduce the BC concentration observed in Ruppel et al (2014) that shows an increase of BC since 1970 over Svalbard (Holtedahlfonna), reflecting a contradiction with other observations, e.g.  Greenland ice cores (McConnell et al, 2007). The chemical transport mode SILAM (silam.fmi.fi) will be the main tool for the simulations that will cover the time period from 1980 to the present day. The analysis will be focused on sources that are currently underestimated in emissions databases, such as small wood combustion and flares in Siberia, and that are believed to contribute for increasing observed over Svalbard.


Short CV

Joana Soares was born in Porto, Portugal. She obtained her first degree from the University of Aveiro (Portugal) in Environmental Engineering, followed by a master in Environmental Sciences from the Wageningen University (The Netherlands) and finally a PhD from the University of Helsinki (Finland). Since 2006 she has been working at the Finnish Meteorological Institute in several internationally and nationally funded projects, mainly working with chemical transport models for the assessment of atmospheric pollution impact by various compounds: acidifying, toxic, photochemical, radioactive and biological; from local to global scale. Also been involved in the assessment for human exposure and intake fraction to different atmospheric pollutants and consequent effects to human health.   


 

Lake Ice modelling in Arctic lakes

Elisa

Elisa Lindgren

Duration of the project: 1. July 2014 to 31. October 2016

Partners in the project: University of Helsinki

Short description of the project

Research in physical processes in ice-covered lakes has been growing recently due to interest in the response of mid- and high-latitude lakes to global warming. Using field measurements from several Finnish lakes, Lake Kilpisjärvi (tundra), Lake Pääjärvi (boreal), Lake Valkeakotinen (boreal) and Lake Vanajavesi (boreal), we aim to develop the existing lake ice model and couple it with a mixed layer water body model. The modeling work is done in close collaboration with the GLEON (Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network, see http://www.gleon.org/) ice project which will provide a data set for about 20 lakes in Europe and North America.

Short CV

2014- Master's degree in Geophysics, University of Helsinki, Finland

2010-2014 Bachelor degree in Geophysics, University of Helsinki, Finland

During the CRAICC project I'll first finish my Master's thesis which concentrates on the data collected from Lake Kilpisjärvi. The data analysis and preliminary modelling will work as a background for the lake ice model.

 


 

Formation and properties of organic aerosols

Kasper Kristensen

 

Dr. Kasper Kristensen

Duration of the project: 15. August 2014 to 15. October 2016

Partners in the project: Aarhus University, University of Helsinki, University of Gothenburg

 

Short description of the project

The atmospheric oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds, such as α-pinene, constitutes an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Once emitted to the atmosphere α-pinene is removed by oxidation processes resulting in the formation of semi- and low-volatile compounds believed to enhance both formation and growth of aerosol in the atmosphere. Recently, extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOC), such as compounds tentatively identified as dimer esters have been identified in both laboratory generated and ambient air aerosol. These highly oxidized and high molecular weight compounds have been shown to form from the ozone-initiated oxidation of α-pinene and are hypothesized to be involved in new particle formation in the atmosphere.
The main focus of the project will be on the formation and occurrence of dimer esters from the oxidation of α-pinene. Through analysis of field data and laboratory experiments the project aims to increase current knowledge on the formation mechanism of dimer esters and furthermore assess the concentrations of these in atmospheric aerosol in Nordic regions.

 

Short CV

2014 PhD in Atmospheric Chemistry, Aarhus University (Denmark)

2012 Master's degree in Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University (Denmark)

2008 Bachelor's degree in Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University (Denmark)

 


 

The sources and influence of aerosols in the Arctic on glacier energy balance

 

Monika Dragosics

 

Monika Dragosics

Duration of the project: 1. September 2013 to 1. September 2016

Partner in the project: University of Iceland, Institute of Earth Sciences (http://earthice.hi.is) (the project includes longer stays, ~12 months total, at NILU, Norway, and Finnish Meteorological Institute and University of Helsinki, Finland)

 

Short description of the project

The project will focus on the source mechanics and impact of deposition of airborne aerosols (dust, volcanic ash, and black carbon) on the glacier surface albedo and possible consequences for the future climate evolution in Arctic regions. The study will make use of data collected from glaciers in Iceland during the summers since mid-1990's; ~10 automatic weather stations on Vatnajökull ice cap since 1996, and 2 stations on Langjökull ice cap since 2001. The aim is to describe the effects of dust and ash dispersion on snow and glacier melt.

 

Short CV

Education

2013-M.Sc. in Mountain and Climatic Geography, University of Graz, Austria.

2010-B.Sc. in Environmental science systems with a Major in Geography at Karl-Franzens-University of Graz, Austria2011-M.Sc. in Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University.

Selected Professional experience
Central Institution for Meteorology and Geodynamics, Vienna, Austria

2010 Trainee of the Climate Research Section/Division Data, Methods, Modeling

2009 Spatial modelling of glacier mass balance

2008 Trainee. Digitalising glacier maps with ArcGIS

 


 

Icelandic volcanic ash and dust: impacts on snow albedo, density and melt

 

OutiMeinander

 

Phil.Lic Outi Meinander

Duration of the project: 1.October 2015 to 30. June 2016

Partners in the project: Finnish Meteorological Institute, Climate Research; Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

 

Short description of the project: Climatic effects of the deposition of light-absorbing particles on snow have been proposed to result from reduced snow albedo and increased melt. Such effects are usually linked to soot (BC), but also volcanic ash and dust from Iceland have an influence which may be larger in the Arctic region than that of soot. There are over 30 active volcanoes or volcanic systems in Iceland, and seven major dust sources. The properties of ash and dust from these sources show considerable physical and chemical variability. The main objective of the project is to study the influence of the deposition of volcanic ash and dust on snow properties (albedo, density and melt), and compare these to soot (BC). For the purpose, outdoor and laboratory experiments, together with Icelandic CRAICC members, as well as modeling approaches will be applied.  Icelandic ash and dust samples will also be measured at 325-2500 nm with an ASD spectroradiometer coupled to a contact probe.

 

Short CV: Phil.Lic. Outi Meinander is a research scientist in Climate Research at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Helsinki in Environmental Sciences. Her licentiate thesis investigated spectral reflectance of Scots pines affected by air pollution. She made additional studies in meteorology (Met-PD) with a thesis on measurements and modeling of ultraviolet radiation with focus on the Antarctic. Outi is a WG member of the COST Snow action ES1404 and a MC substitute of the COST Optical sensing of ecosystem ES1309. As a CRAICC fellow, the objective of her work is to study the influence of the deposition of volcanic ash and dust on snow properties.

 



Molecular modeling of ice nucleation

Olli Pakarinen

Dr. Olli Pakarinen

Duration of the project: 1. May 2014 to 30. April 2016

Partners in the project: University of Helsinki, Finland and Gothenburg University, Sweden

Short description of the project

Clouds have a big influence on the arctic surface energy budget. An accurate description of clouds in climate models requires solid knowledge about their properties, including their phase. Formation of ice clouds, in particular, is not well understood. Ice crystals may form either by homogeneous or heterogeneous ice nucleation. The latter process, where ice formation is initiated by an aerosol seed particle, is already active at temperatures just slightly below the melting point, whereas homogeneous nucleation needs tens of degrees colder temperatures.

The focus of the project is to utilize atomistic simulations to advance ice nucleation theory, which currently is lacking an understanding of the molecular-level properties of ice crystals, as well as reliable parameterizations of the interaction between the forming ice and the seed nucleus in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

Short CV

Olli Pakarinen received his MSc in 2004 from the University of Helsinki and his PhD in 2008 from Helsinki University of Technology, studying particle-surface forces and the effect of water in contacts by computational methods. Since then he has done computational research using molecular dynamics and DFT as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Helsinki and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA.

 


   

Sources, fate and transport of (SLCF) in Polar Regions 

  

Henrik Grythe receized 

 

Henrik Grythe

Duration of the project: 1. November 2011 to 31. October 2015

Partners in the project: D epartment of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm University (Sweden), Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU, Norway) and University of Helsinki (Finland)

 

Short description of the project

Short lived climate forcers (SLCF) in the Arctic have received increasing attention in recent years due to accelerated warming in the Arctic. This PhD will focus on improving Lagrangian transport model FLEXPART parameterization of SLCFs, benefiting from existing parameterizations in the aerosol process based model CALM. Together with the vast, combined Nordic measurement database from both, the Arctic and Antarctica, this modelling tool will be utilized to examine aerosol source profiles, source regions, transport patterns from low latitudes to high latitudes and associated impacts on tropospheric gas phase, aerosol properties, surface albedo and aerosol-cloud interactions. This CRAICC PhD position is a joined effort of Stockholm University, NILU and University of Helsinki. Henrik will spend extensive periods of time at all three institutions during his PhD studies.

 

Short CV

Henrik Grythe is from Oslo, Norway. He attained his masters degree in meteorology, and before that his bachelor\'s degree at University of Oslo (UiO). Before that he studied mathematical finance and risk analysis, also at UiO. His master thesis was on aerosol induced changes in cloud surface radiative forcing in the Arctic. During his time at UiO he was a TA in a computer programming course and worked within Computers in Science Engineering (CSE) developing programming tools for students. On his spare time Henrik is an eager sailor and skier (with numerous Swedish championships in sailing, which he never forget to mention when in Sweden).

 


 

Formation and properties of primary marine particles

Quynh Nguyen

Dr Quynh Nguyen

Duration of the project: 1. November 2013 to 31. October 2015


Partners in the project: Aarhus University, University of Stockholm, University of Gothenburg


Short description of the project

Primary marine particles are formed under windy conditions when air-bubbles get entrained in the ocean by breaking waves. At the surface these bubbles burst resulting in release of droplets containing salt and other components to the atmosphere. The particle production is dependent on temperature and chemical composition of the sea-water but the related chemical and physical processes are poorly understood. The focus of this project is to elucidate the formation of primary marine particles in a controlled laboratory environment under different conditions of temperature and composition of the seawater. Physico-chemical properties of the particles including their ability to act as ice nuclei will be investigated.

Short CV

2013 PhD in Atmospheric Chemistry, Aarhus University (Denmark)
2009 Master in Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management, jointly at University of Manchester (UK), Central European University (Hungary), Lund University (Sweden) and University of Aegean (Greece)
2004 Bachelor in Environmental Sciences (Chemistry major), University of New South Wales (Australia)

 


 

Aerosol emission reductions over the 20th and 21st centuries and their impact on polar climate

Vidya

 

Dr. Vidya Varma

Duration of the project: 1st Sep 2013 – 31st Aug 2015

Partners in the project: Stockholm University (Sweden), Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo (Norway)

 

Short description of the project

Aerosols act as a key forcing in driving the Earth's climate. Owing to its adverse impact on human health, watchful reductions in anthropogenic aerosol particle emissions have already occurred in large parts. These changes in the magnitude and spatial patterns of global aerosol emissions have occurred especially during the 20th century and are projected to continue over the coming century. Of particular relevance for the Arctic are the reductions in sulphate emissions from industrial activities, domestic heating, and power production that have taken place in Europe during the latest decades.
In this project, The Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) will be used to study in detail how regional emissions over Europe affect the radiative balance and the global and Arctic climate.

 

Short CV

2011 - 2013 – Postdoctoral Fellow at University of Bremen, Germany
2011 – PhD in Palaeoclimate Modelling, University of Bremen, Germany
2006 – MSc in Atmospheric Sciences, University of Pune, India
2004 – BSc in Physics, University of Kerala, India

 


 

Organosulfates and terpene oxidation products in Arctic and Nordic aerosols

Anne Maria Hansen

 

Anne Maria Kaldal Hansen

Duration of the project: 1. October 2012 to 30. September 2015

Partners in the project: University of Aarhus, University of Helsinki, Finnish meteorological institute and University of Stockholm.

 

Short description of the project:

Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are known to affect the climate through direct scattering of sunlight and by enhancing cloud formation. The main sources to SOA are biogenic but new research shows that anthropogenic air pollution may enhance the formation of biogenic SOA e.g. through the production of organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates. The goal of this project is to investigate the concentration and composition of organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates in Arctic and Nordic areas, focusing on samples collected in Svalbard, north-east Greenland, Finland and Denmark, as well as synthesizing authentic organosulfate standards and evaluating the influence of organosulfates on aerosol formation.

 

Short CV:

University of Aarhus:
2012.06 M.Sc in chemistry with focus on analytical and atmospheric chemistry
University of Aarhus:
2010.05: B.Sc in chemistry

My Master thesis focused on the formation and concentration levels of organosulfates, nitrooxy organosulfates and terpene oxidation products in Arctic and remote aerosols. Using advanced mass spectrometric (HPLC-q-TOF-MS) analysis I identified and quantified organic acids and organosulfates in field samples from three remote locations. Furthermore I analysed the movement pattern of the collected aerosols outlining the significance of the air mass movements on the composition of the collected aerosols. During my Ph.D study within CRAICC I will further investigate organosulfates and terpene oxidation products in Arctic aerosols.

 


 

Impact of Icelandic dust on air quality, environment and climate 

Pavla Dagsson Waldhauserová 2

 

Dr. Pavla Dagsson Waldhauserová

Duration of the project: 1. October 2014 to 30. September 2015

Partners in the project: University of Iceland and Finnish Meteorological Institute

 

Short description of the project:

The main goal of the project is to determine to what extent is Icelandic dust impacting the climate, air quality (local and distant) and environment (sea, snow and vegetation). Impacts of dust suspension on secondary air pollutants such tropospheric ozone will be investigated. Further campaigns on the vertical stratification and aerosol composition of the subarctic atmosphere and meteorological patterns are planned, both for detection of local dust aerosol as well as particles transported from far distances. We will continue in dust-on-snow deposition experiments in Lapland and Iceland to compare the optical properties of volcanic dust and Black Carbon.

Short CV

Pavla Dagsson-Waldhauserova received her Ph.D. as a joint-degree from the University of Iceland, Dpt. of Physical Sciences, and the Agricultural University of Iceland, Dpt. of Environmental Sciences, in 2014. Her work focused on the variability, origin, physical and optical characteristics of dust aerosol in Iceland. She conducted the first in situ aerosol measurements in Iceland under patronage of the CRAICC and the Eimskip Fund of the University of Iceland in 2012-2014. Together with the Finnish CRAICC members, she took part in the Soot on Snow (SoS-2013) project in Lapland, Finland, investigating a soot and volcanic dust deposition on snow. Pavla is a MC member of the COST Snow action ES1404.
M.Sc. was completed in Physical Geography and Geoecology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic (tropospheric ozone in Central Europe). Volcanology and ash fall studies took part at the Universita degli studi di Cagliari, Sardinia, and University of Iceland in 2006-2007.

 


  

Carbon dioxide fluxes from freshwaters under a changing climate 

  

Blaize Denfield receized 

 

Blaize Denfeld

Duration of the project: 1. September 2011 to 31. August 2015

Partner in the project: Department of Ecology and Genetics/Limnology, University of Uppsala (Sweden)

 

Short description of the project

My research is focused on understanding inland water CO2 evasion with decreasing ice cover duration.  I will study seasonal dynamics of CO2 emissions from inland waters in relation to ice cover dynamics. This will be done in part by conducting high frequency CO2 measurements in Swedish and Finnish lakes and in part by using existing long-term data on ice cover and CO2 emissions from all Nordic countries.
My PhD research is incorporated into the research environment of the Nordic Centre of Excellence CRAICC (Cryosphere-atmosphere interactions in a changing arctic climate) and into the CoW-project (Colour of Water- interplay with climate, and effects of drinking water supply).

 

Short CV

Blaize earned her M.A., in Geographical Information Science (2011) and her B.A., in Earth Systems Science (minor in Geography) (2010) from Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. She spent two summers (2009 and 2010) researching the biogeochemistry of the Kolyma River basin in Northeast Siberia as a participant in the Polaris Project. Her research combined field measurements and remotely sensed imagery to examine regional carbon cycle dynamics (and in particular, how physical and biogeochemical properties drive CO2 evasion from streams and rivers). She has presented her research at conferences and to the public. 

 


 

Measurements and modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer structure in the high-Arctic (Station Nord at 81.3 N)

 Ekaterina Batchvarova new new

 

Prof. Ekaterina Batchvarova - Visiting senior scientist

Duration of the project: 28 August 2012 to 31 August 2015 (4 times 3 month per year)

Partners in the project: Sven-Erik Gryning (DTU Wind Energy, DTU, Denmark), Henrik Skov and Lise Lotte Sørensen (Aarhus University, Denmark) and Timo Vihma (FMI, Finland)

 

Short description:

The project has as starting point measurements carried out at the high-Arctic Station Nord in Greenland which serves as a background station for air pollution. In the project the meteorological measurements at Station Nord will be analyzed, including the formation of the boundary layer height from the ceilometer data as well as from the radiosoundings. The meteorological conditions will be modeled with the WRF/(WRF-Chem) model in its analysis mode for the intensive campaign in order to investigate the skill for simulation of the structure of the boundary-layer. The joint analysis of the chemical and atmospheric measurements will be performed by Risø DTU, FMI and Aarhus University. The project is part of an ongoing collaboration with Aarhus University on long lived greenhouse gases at the Arctic, and will involve FMI in the data analysis.

 

Short CV:

Degrees: DSc in Boundary Layer Meteorology, 2007; PhD in Boundary Layer Meteorology, 1986;

Affiliation since 2010: Professor in Meteorology at NIMH, Head of Section on Air Pollution Modelling; Before that senior scientist and other positions at the same institute since 1980.
Positions abroad: Last was a Marie Curie grant for senior researcher at Risoe DTU, 2009-2011. Before that (in the period 1988 -2008) several visits at Risø National Laboratory on different projects; at Brescia Univercity, Italy; at University of Hatfield, UK; at EC JRC Ispra, Italy and at Ecole Centrale de Nantes, France.

Research Area:
Boundary-layer meteorology and air pollution; Vertical structure of the boundary layer over heterogeneous terrain - internal boundary layer, marine boundary layer, urban boundary layer; Aggregation of fluxes, surface-atmosphere exchange processes of the boreal forest; Parameterisation and experimental studies on the heigh of the boundary layer and vind profile, profiles of turbulent fluxes; Application of mesoscale meteorological models; Evaluation of meteorological models agains data from measurements.

ISI publications by April 2012: 48; ISI journal publications: 27; Citations: 577 (without self-citations: 487); citing articles: 400 (without self-citing articles: 370); h-index: 15; Other publ.: 108 (in WOS 21, in other journalas 27, in books 22; in conference proceedings 38)

Contact:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 


 

 

Energy exchange and DOC production in boreal forests in relation to cryosphere processes

Ville2

 

 

Ville Kasurinen

Duration of the project: 15. April 2012 to 14. April 2015

Partners in the project: University of Helsinki, University of Uppsala, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim  

 

Short description of the project:

The proposed project tries to scale the eddy covariance data from single towers to large regions and compare water balances to river runoff. DOC exports from ecosystems will be modelled and the fate and DOC balance of major arctic and boreal river systems will be analyzed using modelling approaches.

   

Short CV:

Ville Kasurinen has a MSc in Environmental Sciences from the University of Helsinki (2012). His MSc thesis deal with the fate of DOC in large river systems. He has been working on the environment in both the Finnish Environment Institute as well as for a large social and healtcare organization.

 


 

Data Analysis and Regional Scale Modeling of Arctic Aerosol

 

Elham Craicc

Elham Baranizadeh

Duration of the project: 1.June.2012 to 31. May.2015

Partner in the project: University of Eastern Finland (UEF) and Stockholm University

 

Short description of the project:

The project is aimed to quantify the sources of different types of Arctic aerosols – primary versus secondary, locally emitted versus long range transported. We will make use of both long-term and campaign-wise measurements together with regional scale modeling. In practice, the study will be based on analyzing long time series of aerosol particle size distributions from different field measurements sites and supporting meteorological and gas-phase measurements recorded at Puijo in Finland; Bologna and San Pietro Capofiume in Italy; Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany; Mace Head in Ireland, and other stations mainly in the Nordic countries. Additionally, we also will use theoretical, statistical approaches and modeling studies to support our detailed characterization of the formation and growth processes using field observations. Moreover, I will participate in regional aerosol modeling and model-data comparisons with the goal of quantifying Arctic aerosol sources.

 
Short CV

M.Sc., December 2010: Solid state Physics, Zanjan University, Iran

Dissertation title: “Assessment   and Validation of PERSIANN Satellite-based Rainfall Algorithm Using Gridded Ground-based   Precipitation Data”. I extended my work by validation of NASA TRMM3B43, and Bias Adjusted PERSIANN data sets using ground-based data.

B.Sc, May 2007: Atomic Physics, Urmia University, Iran

 


 

 

Ice and Liquid-phase Cloud Activation and Gas-Aerosol Interactions of Insoluble and Slightly Soluble Particles 

  

 

MaryamDalirian

 

Maryam Dalirian

Start and duration of the project: 1. March 2012 to 31. March 2015

Partners: University of Eastern Finland and University of Stockholm

 

Short description of the project:

Water-insoluble inclusions in aerosols that are activated to cloud droplets may have an important role especially in supercooled conditions as the cloud droplets may subsequently freeze, and this freezing may be initiated by ice nucleation on the insoluble inclusions. In the Arctic, feedback processes between clouds and the underlying land, ocean or sea-ice surface are dependent on the physical phase of the cloud, and therefore better understanding of the processes determining the cloud phase is of utmost importance. In this project we will study the initial step of cloud formation, i.e. activation, of insoluble and sparingly soluble particles both theoretically and experimentally.

 

Short CV:
Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran
2011.01, (M.S.) Chemical Engineering (Thermodynamics and kinetics)
Isfahan University of Technology, Iran
2002.02, (B.S.) Chemical Engineering (Petrochemical industries)

My M.S. thesis focused on measurement and modeling of surface tension for multi-component mixtures containing ambient aerosol including carboxylic acids, alcanoic acids and other carbonaceous species. I am interested in the field of aerosols, their composition and their roles on climate changing, global warming and cloud activation as aerosols impact both droplet and ice formation by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN). I want to continue my researches in field of the behavior of aerosols, clouds and atmospheric processes and their effect on climate modeling.

 


 

Process-based modelling of anthropogenic versus biogenic influence on the aerosol-cloud-climate system over the subarctic region

 

Pontus

 

Dr Pontus Roldin

Duration of the project: 1. April 2014 to 31. March 2015

Partners in the project: University of Helsinki and Lund University

Short description of the project

The main objective with the project is to combine, and develop process-based models for aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle phase chemistry, gas-particle partitioning, diffusion limited transport in the particle phase, BVOC emissions, cloud microphysics, radiative transfer, planetary boundary layer meteorology, and in-canopy fluxes of aerosol particles, gases and light. The models will be used for detailed studied of the complete BVOC-aerosol-cloud-climate chain, and how it responds to anthropogenic emissions and feedback on future climate and forestry. The scientific goals are to: (1) deliver fundamental knowledge about the interactions and relative contribution of anthropogenic versus biogenic sources to the number of CCN, and ultimately the aerosol radiative forcing over the subarctic region, and (2) to provide the process-level modelling tools that are needed to properly evaluate simplified process descriptions which can be implemented in Earth system models.

 

Short CV
2013 – PhD in Physics, Lund University, Sweden, Title of thesis: Process based Modelling of Chemical and Physical Aerosol Properties Relevant for Climate and Health.

  


 

Linking past black carbon (BC) variations in lake sediments and Svalbard ice core data

 

Meri Ruppel receized

Meri Ruppel

Duration of the project: 1. January 2012 to 31. December 2014

Partner in the project: Norwegian Polar Institute (Norway) and University of Helsinki, Department of Environmental Sciences, ECRU (Finland)

 

Short description of the project:

Black carbon (BC) is an aerosol resulting from the incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuels. It is a strong climate warming agent especially in the Arctic where it decreases the albedo of snow and ice and causes their earlier melt. One of the objectives in CRAICC is to quantify the present and past concentrations of different short lived climate forcers such as BC in the Arctic. The aim of this project is to quantify the BC concentration in the European Arctic for the last 200 years. The pre-industrial BC concentrations from a lake sediment core in Svalbard will be compared to concentrations in continental lakes of northern Europe. Secondly the BC quantification method of high refractory soot BC from lake sediments is going to be tested for ice core samples from Svalbard. The project will strengthen our understanding on the past variations in BC concentrations and shed light on the sources and environmental impacts of BC in the past.

 

Short CV

Meri Ruppel earned her Master’s degree in environmental biology in 2009 at the University of Helsinki. Since the beginning of 2010 she has worked on her PhD in the Environmental Change Research Unit (ECRU) at the University of Helsinki. The main objective of her research is the quantification, source apportionment and environmental impact assessment of BC in the European Arctic since the industrial revolution. In order to do this she uses different methods to quantify the different parts of the BC continuum and is developing these methods into the facilities of the University of Helsinki.

 


 

 

Modeling of high latitude forcing and climate impact of short-lived climate forcers

Maria Sand

Maria Sand

Duration of the project: 1. September 2013 to 31. August 2014

Partner in the project: Center for International Climate and Environmental Research Oslo (CICERO) and University of Oslo

 

Short description of the project:

Short-lived climate forcers (SLCF) including all aerosol species and also tropospheric ozone might have a particular impact on Arctic climate. In this project the NorESM model with interactive gas-phase chemistry, aerosol microphysics and interactive clouds, will be used to simulate formation and transport of short-lived climate forcers to the Arctic, as well as their impact on radiative forcing and climate response. In the simulations special focus will be given to the direct radiative forcing of black carbon (BC), BC on snow and ice as well as the semi-direct effect. The project will be closely linked to the work of expert group on SLCF and Arctic climate of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment program (AMAP).

 

Short CV:

2008- PhD programme at the Department of geosciences, University of Oslo; 'The forcing and climate response of black carbon'

2006-2008 Master degree in Geosciences, University of Oslo. Master thesis in dynamical meteorology.

2003-2006 Bachelor degree in Geosciences, University of Oslo


 

Quantification of VOC emissions from periodically ice-coverred aquatic sources (iceVOC)

 

Elina Peltomaa receized

 

Elina Peltimaa

Duration of the project: 1. January to 30. June 2014

Partners in the project: University of Helsinki, University of Gothenburg and Finnish Meteorological Institute

 

Short description of the project

 Biological sources of VOCs in aquatic ecosystems are related to algal and microbial functions, which have been reported to produce significant quantities of volatile compounds, especially during the algal bloom periods. In inland lakes algae and bacteria produce VOCs in quantities comparable to those of terrestrial soil and forest floor vegetation, and the diurnal pattern of emissions indicates a significant contribution of biological metabolism on the production of VOCs. Aquatic VOC emissions have mostly been measured during the ice-free period which is when the biological activity is greatest. However, the ice cover does not inhibit bacterial metabolism which is independent on light. Since algal photosynthesis begins already below the ice cover after snow has disappeared, it is anticipated that biologically produced VOCs could accumulate in water beneath the ice cover, and be rather rapidly released to the air during the ice melt period. Within this CRAICC project the VOC flux from two different freshwater ecosystems will be quantified with spring- and summertime measurements, including supplementary laboratory experiments.

 

Short CV

 Elina Peltomaa received her MSc in 2007 in Ecological and Environmental Sciences (University of Helsinki) and her PhD in Aquatic Sciences in 2013 (at the Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki). The topic of her dissertation was 'Phytoplanktonic life in boreal humic lakes: special emphasis on autotrophic picoplankton and microbial food webs', and it dealt e.g. with dissolved algal exudates as well as the impact of changing climate on phytoplankton and further on aquatic food webs in periodically ice-covered lakes.

 


 

Satellite retrieval of aerosol properties over the Arctic and impacts on climate (SAAC)

 

Ksenia Aatlaskina

 

 

 

Ksenia Atlaskina

 

Duration of the project: 1. July 2011 to 1. July 2014

 

Partner in the project: University of Helsinki (Finland)

 

Short description of the project

 

The deposition of aerosol particles on snow affects snow albedo and snow melt. The detection of aerosols over bright surfaces poses a large problem when the surface reflectance is much larger than the aerosol reflectance. The objective of this project is to use satellite remote sensing to evaluate the effects of aerosols on the direct radiative effect on the Arctic climate. The work will initially focus on volcanic ash plumes information retrieval with a possible extension to forest fires plumes. In the second step the use of wavelengths in the near- and thermal infrared, which usually are not used for aerosol retrieval, will be explored to obtain better results. Also the effect of the use of different aerosol models will be explored. Once the aerosol properties can be successfully retrieved, the results will be used together with radiative transfer models to evaluate the direct radiative effect on the Arctic climate. This requires both the characterization of the aerosol properties and the surface albedo. The latter is obtained as a by-product of the aerosol retrieval but for CRAICC it is a main product.

 

Short CV

 

Ksenia Atlaskina earned her master degree in meteorology/climatology in 2007 at St. Petersburg State University, Faculty of Geography and Geoecology, Department of Climatology and Environmental Monitoring, St. Petersburg, Russia. The master thesis was dedicated to Arctic climate evolution through the 20th and 21st centuries using an ensemble of atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. After graduation Ksenia joined for one year the Climate Modeling Group at Voeikov Main Geophysical Observatory, St. Petersburg, Russia, as a junior research scientist and continued her work started before with emphasis on modeled temperature and salinity fields for Arctic Ocean. Ksenia started her PhD work in 2011 at University of Helsinki within the CRAICC project.

 


 

 

Sulphate salts during different climatic conditions

Ikumi Oyabu

 

Ikumi Oyabu

Duration of the project: 1. March 2013 to 28. February 2014

Partner in the project: Stockholm University

Short description of the project:

Sulphate aerosols, particularly micrometre-sized particles of sulphate salt and sulphate-adhered dust, can act as cloud condensation nuclei, leading to increased solar scattering that cools Earth's climate. Evidence for such a coupling may lie in the sulphate record from polar ice cores, but previous analyses of melted ice-core samples have provided only sulphate ion concentrations, which may be due to sulphuric acid. In order to clarify characteristics of chemical compositions of soluble aerosols deposited in polar environments, we will measure constituent elements of nonvolatile particles during the last deglaciation in the NEEM (Greenland) ice core by the ice-sublimation method. In addition, we will try to construct the calculation scheme of sulfate (soluble) salts concentrations in the past using ion concentrations, which can be important information to consider the influence of sulfate (soluble) aerosols to past Arctic climate.

Short CV

2012.03 M.A. in Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, Japan
2010.03 B.A. in Human Development, Kobe University, Japan
My M.A. thesis focused on the chemical compositions of soluble aerosols during the last deglaciation (25000 – 11000 yr BP) in the Dome Fuji (Antarctica) ice core. Using the ice-sublimation method, I showed the transition of sulfate salts compositions and the relationship between sulfate salts fluxes and temperature change in inland Antarctica. During my Ph.D work within CRAICC, I want to clarify the characteristics of characteristics of chemical compositions of soluble aerosols in the Arctic region in the past.

 


Cloud formation in the arctic region: laboratory and field observations

 

Juan Hong

 

Juan Hong

Duration of the project: 1. January 2012 to 31. December 2013

Partners in the project: University of Helsinki, University of Stockholm and Univesity of Copenhagen

 

Short description of the project:

Particles in the atmosphere affect global climate via direct scattering of sunlight and via their role as seeds for the formation of cloud droplets. There are many sources of atmospheric particles both biogenic and anthropogenic. Atmospheric aerosol particles vary in composition and thus differ in their environment and climate effects. The extent to which they contribute to the climate effect is not well documented. Therefore, further understanding the composition and their thermodynamic properties are necessary. The primary goal of this work is to provide laboratory and ambient data on aerosol particles that can be used to quantify aerosol effects on climate change. This is acquired by resolving the spatial and temporal variability of hygroscopicity, cloud droplet formation and volatility of ambient aerosols particles.

 

Short CV:

Juan Hong has obtained her master degree in Environmental chemistry in 2010 at University of Copenhagen, Department of Chemistry. Her master\'s project addresses the thermodynamic properties and cloud nucleating abilities of organic aerosols components. Using a modified tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) system combined with a laminar flow tube, I measured evaporation rates of polyol aerosol particles and infer vapor pressures using mass transfer theory. Another part of my project focused on the CCN activity of tri-carboxylic acids by using a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC). Finally, the project included measurements of melting and evaporation enthalpies using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) to infer the sub-cooled vapor pressures. After graduation, I spent half year in the same group, continuing with the previous work on volatility and cloud formation ability. Right now, I\'m a PhD student at University of Helsinki, Department of Physics. During my PhD study within CRAICC, I will further investigate the reaction between water molecules and atmospheric particles.

 


 

Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation 

 

Erik Thomson

 

Dr. Erik S. Thomson

Duration of the project: 1. January 2012 to 31. December 2013

Partners in the project: University of Gothenburg, University of Copenhagen, Lund University

 

Short description of the project:

Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role for the properties and action of clouds in the atmosphere, and is known to have strong effects on Earth’s radiation budget and precipitation processes. This project will focus on building fundamental understandings of ice nucleation processes in the Arctic and sub-Arctic atmosphere. This will include the development and implementation of the first Nordic ice nuclei counters for laboratory and field use. Studies of ice nucleation using these new instruments and existing equipment will focus on the physical and chemical effects of aerosol particles on ice nucleation processes. In addition to contributing to the understanding of fundamental atmospheric processes these studies will be benefit cloud modeling efforts from regional to global scales.

 

Short CV:

Erik S. Thomson received his PhD in Geology and Geophysics from Yale University in New Haven, CT, USA. There Erik developed new optical methods to study the phase behavior of polycrystalline ice, and in particular grain boundaries, very close to melting. After finishing his PhD Erik moved to Gothenburg for a one-year postdoctoral position where he studied ice freezing, ice/substrate, and ice/surfactant interactions primarily using Ultra High Vacuum techniques. Joining CRAICC Erik will prolong his time in Gothenburg and join the CRAICC partners, with a more specific focus on measuring and understanding heterogeneous ice nucleation. Erik says, “Although at high latitudes it is never far away, accurately predicting the formation of ice in clouds, based on climatic conditions and atmospheric composition remains a challenging yet vital task.”

 


 

Atmospheric aerosols distribution and microphysical properties in Polar Regions

Radek

Radovan Krejci

Duration: 3 x 3 months in 2012 and 2013

Partner: University of Helsinki, Department of Physics

Short description of the project:

This CRAICC fellowship deals mainly with WP4 theme: Short Lived Climate Forcers (SLCF) in Polar regions. Main focus will be on
1) Atmospheric aerosol distribution, variability, sources and sinks in Polar regions
2) Influence of the open sea and sea ice on atmospheric aerosol properties
3) Analysis of the airborne aerosol observations from the Arctic and Antarctica with special aim on similarities and differences between both high latitude regions
4) Combining long term observations from ground based stations in the Arctic

Short CV:

Researcher at Dept. of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University since 2008
Research Scientist (Forskarassistent) at Dept. of Meteorology, Stockholm University 2004 - 2008
Ph.D., Chemical Meteorology, Stockholm University, Stockholm 2002

 


 

Aerosol particles from ship traffic in the Arctic

 

Niku Kivekas

 

Niku Kivekäs

Duration of the project: 1.November .2012 - 31.December 2013

Partner in the project: University of Lund

 

Project description:

The project focuses on the various climate effects of the increasing ship traffic in ta Arctic area. This includes effects on the albedo of snow and ice, increased number of particles able to act as cloud condensing nuclei and increased amount of condensable vapors for new particle formation. The research includes modeling of the ageing and transportation of the plume, as well as analysis of long data series collected at coastal and near-coast measuring stations within the CRAICC network.

 

Short CV

Senior Research Scientist, Aerosols and Climate, Finnish Meteorological Institute 2010-2012 Ph.D. in Aerosol Physics, Helsinki University 2010 Research Scientist, Aerosols and Climate, Finnish Meteorological Institute 2005-2010

M.Sc(tech.) in Physical Chemistry, Helsinki University of Technology 2005


 

Quantification of VOC emissions from periodically ice-covered aquatic sources

Hermanni Altonen

Hermanni Aaltonen, Ph.D.

Duration of the project: 1. January to 30. June 2013

Partners in the project: University of Helsinki, University of Gothenburg and Finnish Meteorological Institute

 

Short description of the project

Biological sources of VOCs in aquatic ecosystems are related to algal and microbial functions, which have been reported to produce significant quantities of volatile compounds, especially during the algal bloom periods. In inland lakes algae and bacteria produce VOCs in quantities comparable to those of terrestrial soil and forest floor vegetation, and the diurnal pattern of emissions indicates a significant contribution of biological metabolism on the production of VOCs. Aquatic VOC emissions have mostly been measured during the ice-free period which is when the biological activity is greatest. However, the ice cover does not inhibit bacterial metabolism which is independent on light. Since algal photosynthesis begins already below the ice cover after snow has disappeared, it is anticipated that biologically produced VOCs could accumulate in water beneath the ice cover, and be rather rapidly released to the air during the ice melt period. Within this CRAICC project the VOC flux from two different freshwater ecosystems will be quantified with spring- and summertime measurements, including supplementary laboratory experiments.

 

Short CV

M.Sc. 2007, Department of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki

Ph.D. 2012, Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki

Dissertation: Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor


Deposition of absorbing aerosol on snow and its climate effects

 

Jonas Svensson receized

 

Jonas Svensson

Duration of the project: 28. November 2011 to 28. October 2013

Partner in the project: Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland)

Short description of the project

Absorbing aerosol, in addition to greenhouse gases, has been acknowledged as a significant climate forcer in the Arctic. The objective with the position will be to study the deposition of absorbing aerosol on snow and its climatic effects. A focus will be on soot, an absorbing aerosol, with investigations of methods to analyze soot concentrations in snow. Field studies and controlled field experiments will be utilized to further increase our understanding of soot interaction with snow.

Short CV

Education

2011-M.Sc. in Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University.

2010-B.Sc. in Earth Science, Stockholm University.

Selected Professional experience

2011-MarinMätTeknik (MMT AB), geologist for marine surveying company

2010, 2009 & 2008-Tarfala Research Station, seasonal research assistant at glaciological research station.


Past long-term changes in the Arctic

Keyan Fang

Dr. Keyan Fang

Duration of the project: 1. September 2011 to 31. August 2013

Partners in the project: University of Helsinki and University of Lund

Short description of the project:
We simulate the Arctic treeline dynamics at species-level during the Holocene period, which are compared with the proxy-based vegetation reconstructions. The feedback of the treeline changes to climate change is evaluated considering its modifications on albedo, carbon cycles, etc. We plan to optimize the parameters of vegetation model via simulation-reconstruction comparisons during the historical and instrumental periods, which is used to model future treeline changes under future scenarios of climate change in the 21th century.

 

Short CV:

Lanzhou University
2007.9-2010.12 (Ph.D.) Physical Geography
Columbia University
2007.12-2009.11 (engaged in a joint training program)
Lanzhou University
2005.9-2006.6 (M.Sc.) Physical Geography
Lanzhou University
2001.9-2005.6 (B.Sc.) Physical Geography (National Training Base in Geography)


Implementing new particle formation in NorESM

Risto

Dr Risto Makkonen

Duration of the project: 1. July 2012 to 30. June 2013

Partner in the project: University of Oslo (Norway) and University of Helsinki (Finland)

 

Short description of the project

Atmospheric new particle formation is a global phenomenon. With sufficient condensable vapors available, nucleated particles can grow to sizes capable of activating as cloud droplets. New particle formation affects both the natural background and the anthropogenic perturbation of the aerosol indirect effect. Hence, climate models need to include a mechanistic description of nucleation and the subsequent growth. Within this CRAICC position, processes related to new particle formation are included in the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM), allowing to quantify indirect effects and climate feedbacks related to new particle formation.

 

Short CV

Risto Makkonen earned his M.Sc. in physics from University of Helsinki (2006) and his Ph.D. in 2012, also in University of Helsinki. His Ph.D. thesis, titled "From nanoclusters to climate forcers: global modeling of aerosol climate effects", focused on nucleation and indirect effects in the global climate model ECHAM5-HAM. His research interests include climate feedbacks via biogenic VOCs, role of anthropogenic aerosol emissions in climate change, and aerosol-cloud interactions.


Sea spray sources at low temperatures

Mathew Salter receized

Dr. Mathew Salter

Duration of the project: 1. January 2012 to 30. June 2013

Partner in the project: Department of Applied Environmental Science, ITM (Sweden)

Short description of the project

The Mårtensson et al. (2003, JGR) source parameterization includes the effect of sea surface temperature on sea salt sea spray production. We are yet to determine the effect of temperature changes on emissions of organic sea spray and marine bacteria. Struthers et al. (2011, ACP) show that the sea salt sea spray alone is responsible for a direct forcing of -0.2 to -0.4 Wm-2 over the Arctic Ocean in response to warming and sea ice retreat. The first indirect effect is about 10 times larger. Also within the sea spray emission inventory of the GRACE project we have estimated a 30% increase in sea salt sea spray emissions in the Arctic up to 2100. However, recent field data emphasize the importance of organic/biological sea spray, and new Arctic field data from the GRACE project suggest that the Mårtensson-parameterization underestimates the sensitivity in sea spray formation at temperatures near melting/freezing. This project are based on laboratory simulations of sea spray formation, focusing on simple systems with individual marine bacteria species and their excretions, with the intention to test more and more complex systems, to help understand existing field data, and to derive new source parameterizations for organic sea spray and marine bacteria, and thereby enable source inventories and to improved climate simulations. This work will therefore address several specific CRAICC deliverables. The post doc will be located at Stockholm University, but visit Copenhagen University for periods, where related experiments will be made.

 

Short CV

Mathew Salter, originally an oceanographer from Southampton University, has a PhD in Marine Biogeochemistry from Newcastle University, UK, 2010. His thesis was titled "A role for natural surfactants in air–sea gas exchange?" His research interests includes air-sea interaction, sources, composition and distribution of surface-active organic matter in the marine surface water, the biological and physico-chemical controls on air-water gas exchange focused on the effects of biogenic surfactants, controls on the flux, age and composition of organic carbon within the aquatic exosystem. During his post doc with CRAICC he will extend this to include the biological and physico-chemical control of sea spray emissions.


The effect of sea-ice loss and climate change on the natural sulphur cycle and radiative forcing: Improved representation of DMS emissions in NorESM

Hamish Struthers

Dr Hamish Struthers

Duration of the project: 1. September 2012 to 31. December 2012

Partner in the project: MISU, Stockholm University and the Norwegian Meteorological Institute

 

Short description of the project

The natural environment is a major source of atmospheric aerosols. In order to quantify the anthropogenic aerosol climate effect it is necessary to know the natural aerosol production rate and how this is perturbed by a changing climate. However, emissions of natural aerosols, such as sea salt and secondary aerosols formed from dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions, are often treated in a simplified manner in Earth System Models (ESMs). The reason is partly insufficient understanding of the underlying processes, but also the challenge of transforming state-of-the art knowledge on the process scale into computationally fast and well-evaluated parameterizations that can be used in ESMs. In this project, an interactive DMS emission will be implemented in a state-of-the-art ESM (the NorESM). How the updated treatment of DMS emission parameterization in NorESM affects the natural aerosol background concentration in a changing climate will be investigated.

 

Short CV

01.2011 - 08.2012: Researcher, Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University.
01.2009 - 12.2010: Postdoctoral fellow, Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University.
12.2003 - 11.2008: Scientist, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand.
11.2001 - 11.2003: Postdoctoral fellow, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand.
07.1998 - 10.2001: Postdoctoral fellow, Department of Meteorology, Reading University, UK.
06.1998: PhD Chemistry. University of Canterbury, New Zealand.

 


  

Long-range transported aerosols to the high Arctic

 

Andreas Massling new

Dr Andreas Massling

Duration of the project: 01. October 2012 to 31. December 2012

Partner in the project: Jon Egill Kristjansson, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

 

Short description:
Aarhus University is heading a research station (St. Nord) in Northern Greenland (81o 36' N, 16o 40' W at 6 m ASL). Long-range transport of aerosols originated from Europe and Asia is observed at the station during the polluted season (winter/spring) every year, which is assigned to a significant increase in pollutant concentrations. In this project we plan to further analyze data with respect to physical particle parameters obtained at St. Nord. The analysis of the comprehensive dataset will gain information on the transport of polluted air masses from Europe and Asia to the station. Additionally, an aerosol course on "Physics and chemistry of atmospheric particles" on Ph.D. level is organized and carried out at Oslo University during the project period. The course is open for Nordic students.

 

Short CV:
10.2012 – present: Visiting senior scientist at the Department of Geosciences, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; funded by Nordic Centre of Excellence (NCoE) CRyosphere - Atmosphere Interactions in a Changing Climate (CRAICC).
11.2007 – present: Senior scientist (Faculty staff) at the Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Roskilde, Denmark (previously National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Atmospheric Environment, Aarhus University).
04.2006 – 10.2007: Scientist at the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Department of Physics, Leipzig, Germany.
07.2004 – 03.2006: Postdoctoral Fellow, Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; funded by Nordic Centre of Excellence (NCoE) Biosphere - Atmosphere Cloud Climate Interaction (BACCI).
02.2002 – 06.2004: Postdoctoral Scientist at the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Department of Physics, Leipzig, Germany.

 


 

Tree species inventories in the northern hemisphere

 

Carsten Ambelas Skjth receized 

Dr. Carsten Ambelas Skjøth (CAS)

Duration of the project:  1. September 2011 to 28. February 2012

Partner in the project: Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University (Denmark) 

 

Short description of the project

The project ‘Tree species inventories in the Northern Hemisphere’ is the creation of a data base with forest trees on species level in the Northern Hemisphere. The data are to be used by existing ecosystem and atmospheric models. The work will include analyses of existing data, obtaining new data from non-European forest inventories and harmonization of data for implementation in the models used in CRAICC

 

Short CV

CAS obtained his PhD degree in March 2009 at Copenhagen University based on a thesis with the title \"Integrating Measurements, Phenological Models and Atmospheric Models in Aerobiology - Creating New Concepts within Aerobiological Integrated Monitoring and Forecasting”. Has afterwards worked as scientist at Aarhus University until May2010 and since then as a Post Doc at Lund University based on an individual fellowship from the Villum-Kann Rasmussen foundation. CAS is active in the international research project ECLAIRE and several international scientific networks. 33 articles in web-of science, 13 as leading author, h-index: 11

 


 

 Linking Svalbard ice core records to atmospheric measurements at Zeppelin station

 

Tjarda J. Roberts receized 

Dr. Tjarda J. Roberts

Duration of the project: 1. September to 31. December 2011

Partner in the project: Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø (Norway) 

Short description of the project

This CRAICC post involves analysis of atmospheric monitoring data to understand changes in pollutants and atmospheric properties as recorded at Mt Zeppelin over the past 20 years. This will strengthen our ability to form links between phenomena observed in the atmosphere, and contaminants as recorded in Svalbard ice-cores, ultimately improving our interpretation of the Svalbard ice-core records.

 

Short CV

Dr Tjarda Roberts’ research to date has focused on the chemistry and fate of pollutants in the troposphere. She has developed new instruments for measuring volcanic gas emissions, and a new model of the complex reactive halogen (BrO) chemistry of volcanic plumes. The discovery of volcanic plume BrO chemistry lead to the prediction of mini ozone holes downwind of volcanoes, that was simulated by the model and has recently been observed. Further model-observation comparisons in this area are ongoing. At the Norwegian Polar Institute she has co-advised PhD students within the EU-wide NSINK project, and undertaken research into the glacial biogeochemical impacts of Nitrogen pollutants deposited to the nutrient-limited Arctic. Her recent Arctic field activities include teaching-by-research activities on a sea-ice cruise, as Guest Lecturer in Arctic Contaminants at UNIS, and is a participant in a project flying novel CMET (Controlled Meteorological) balloons in the Arctic.