Annual global carbon emissions set to reach record 36 billion tonnes in 2013

Global emissions of carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels are set to rise again in 2013, reaching a record high of 36 billion tonnes - according to new figures from the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme's Global Carbon Project.

The 2.1 per cent rise projected for 2013 means global emissions from burning fossil fuel are 61 per cent above 1990 levels, the baseline year for the Kyoto Protocol. Professor Corinne Le Quéré of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of East Anglia led the Global Carbon Budget report. “Governments meeting in Warsaw this week need to agree on how to reverse this trend. Emissions must fall substantially and rapidly if we are to limit global climate change to below two degrees."
The project also launched a new Global Carbon Atlas - an online platform showing the world’s biggest carbon emitters. The Carbon Atlas reveals the biggest carbon emitters of 2012, what is driving the growth in China’s emissions, and where the UK is outsourcing its emissions. Users can also compare EU emissions and see which countries are providing the largest environmental services to the rest of the world by removing carbon from the atmosphere.
Professor Le Quéré said, “Everyone can explore their own emissions, and compare them with their neighbouring countries - past, present, and future.” 
Global carbon budget (Brief, data, presentation, images)
Global Carbon Atlas